This Ballot: Politico's Independent Presidential Primary

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  • Jon Huntsman
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  • Condoleeza Rice
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  • Hillary Clinton
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  • Michael Bloomberg
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  • Erskine Bowles
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  • John Chambers
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  • Colin Powell
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  • David M. Walker
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  • Mark Warner
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  • David Petraeus
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Jon Huntsman

Candidate Image

A truth-telling fiscal conservative who takes up for science and speaks out against right-wing extremism. A Republican who served in President Barack Obama's administration. A former red-state governor who appeals to the nation's effete elite. Jon Huntsman's profile is no recipe success in a Republican primary. But it could be extremely appealing to the group that decides American presidential elections – the big middle. From the first days of Obama's presidency, the White House had feared Huntsman as a potential general election candidate. Indeed, a desire to get him out of the political mix was part of the calculus that made him ambassador to China – an effort that backfired when he ran anyway, and this time with experience on the world stage. But Huntsman's hurdle has always been clear: It's tough to figure a path for him in a Republican nominating contest dominated by hard-core conservatives. So several nominators in the POLITICO Primary had a novel idea: The former Utah governor should go independent. Let the voters have their say without the Republican base as a screening committee. @anazagarus (Christopher) tweeted: "He has no shot on the right, or left, but the middle is all his." @UnderagePolitix added: "His centrist views & positive, broad experience can win, especially w/ a center-left running mate." And @natedavidson observed bluntly: "Very electable and rejected by his party." Aides say Huntsman isn't running as an independent for a simple reason: He's a Republican. While some Republicans are squeamish about his moderate positions on the environment and gay rights, his campaign says his fiscal conservatism and opposition to abortion are squarely in the party's wheelhouse. But close your eyes as Huntsman, 51, appears on ABC's "This Week," talking about Texas Gov. Rick Perry: "When you find yourself at an extreme end of the Republican Party, you make yourself unelectable." Or on CBS's "Face the Nation," where he described his tax-reform plan: getting rid of "all loopholes, all deductions, all subsidies, all corporate welfare ... to lower rates across the board and do it in a revenue-neutral fashion." Pressed by anchor Bob Schieffer on whether that includes mortgage-interest deductions, Huntsman replied pleasantly: "That means no deductions. That means no deductions at all." Or at his campaign announcement, in which he said: "I've lived overseas four times ... In the great state of Utah when I was governor, we cut taxes. We flattened rates. We balanced our budget. We worked very hard to maintain our AAA-bond-rating status, something few states can claim. And when the economic crisis hit, we were prepared." Experienced, modulated and center-right. In an era when swing voters want to turn down the volume, Huntsman might sound just about right

Condoleeza Rice

Candidate Image

There is a market for someone who breaks free from the tired right-versus-left constraint on modern politics, always has been, always will be. It feels like a bull market these days, as public loathing of Democrats and Republicans burns hotter. To meet the demands of this market, a candidate would probably need to offer up some strong anti-Washington, anti-Wall street populism softened with some "small c" conservatism to pull in independents and independent-minded voters in each party. Condi Rice a woman of many firsts could play that tune. Rice, 56, was once a Democrat, having advised former Colorado Sen. Gary Hart. She switched to the GOP in the 1980s, and seems to walk a line comfortably down the middle of the political spectrum. She's mildly pro-choice, in her words, and betrays a strong allergy to the red-hot politics of the freak show. "I would like to see the politics cool down," she told CNN's Piers Morgan after the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. "I would like to see us cool off as a country. I'd like us all to be more careful what we say about one another and give politicians time to solve some of these very difficult issues that we face." Rice would need to find a sharper, more populist voice. But she can play at this level. Rice, who entered college at 15, is a high achiever and trailblazer. She was the first female, first minority and youngest provost in Stanford history. She inherited a big deficit there, and within two years balanced its budget (perhaps she should have run for the budget office, not the State Department for George W. Bush). Rice, 56, was Bush's national security adviser, the first woman to hold the post and later rose to Secretary of State. She has since returned to academia, but could easily make the case that her life experience positions her well for grappling with global and domestic issues. In a childhood memoir published last year, "Extraordinary, Ordinary People," she wrote: "John and Angelena Rice somehow raised their little girl in Jim Crow Birmingham to believe that even if she couldn't have a hamburger at the Woolworth's lunch counter, she could be president of the United States." Prescient? And even after adopting the GOP jersey during the Reagan years, she remained iconoclastic: She favors abortion rights and advised Gary Hart when he was gearing up to run against George H.W. Bush then served on the elder Bush's national security staff. After tutoring his son in foreign policy during the 2000 campaign, she spent frequent weekends at Camp David with him and Laura Bush. Rice has been talked about as a potential president since her childhood in the segregationist South, but has often said her ultimate ambition was to be NFL commissioner. Maybe she was setting her sights too low.

Hillary Clinton

Candidate Image

It will take a combination of money, accomplishment and celebrity to overcome the enormous barriers to a third-party victory. Imagine if that person had experience running against Republicans AND Barack Obama, too. Enter Hillary. She is so famous she's known by her first name, her family's access to rich donors is legendary and no one in modern politics has done more to rehabilitate their national image over the past two years than her. Heck, her favorable rating topped 65 percent in recent polls. There's the minor inconvenience that she's a lifelong Democrat, works for Obama and seems hell-bent on getting out of the public arena (before she runs again in 2016). She will need to explain all of that away. Here's how. Clinton could plunge in with a nonpartisan campaign that merges the two chapters of her political life: managing a world on fire as secretary of state the past two years and helping her husband oversee eight years of prosperity during the 1990s. Given the poles of Rick Perry Republicans on one side and Obama liberals on the other, there's a nice swath of middle to claim. It's no secret she's a hawk on most matters overseas and one can safely assume she would be more of a centrist on economic issues than her current boss. She would have to make a strong my-country-needs-me-so-I'm-making-this-big-leap argument and could turn to Mark Penn and Greenberg for advice on navigating the disenchanted segment with a pro-business, tough-on-China, America-rocks message. One could imagine business leaders eating this up. So the money will flow in. One could also imagine centrist Democrats, unaffiliated swing voters and more than a few moderate Republicans enjoying it, too. Dick Cheney recently called her the most competent Obama Cabinet member, a powerful reminder that her reputation has improved, even among her harshest critics. Cheney mischievously suggested she should challenge her boss for the nomination. That's not going to happen, which is why an independent bid while far-fetched right now has an elegant logic. DebateGraph
Wikipedia

Michael Bloomberg

Candidate Image

Voters have watched first George W. Bush and then Barack Obama promise to reach out to the other party then not only fail spectacularly at bipartisanship but make the city's divisions even deeper. Many voters would like to turn their backs on both parties and love the idea of a politician who has done just that. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was a lifelong Democrat who joined the Republican Party in 2001, then dropped any party affiliation six years later. "The politics of partisanship and the resulting inaction and excuses have paralyzed decision making," he said in a speech explaining his decision. "The big issues of the day are not being addressed, leaving our future in jeopardy." Bloomberg, 69, is totally independent of Washington; has never taken a dime of special-interest money (because he's worth $19.5 billion, according to Forbes); is not a member of either political party; and built a monstrously successful company, the Bloomberg LLP data and publishing giant, before turning to public office. The three-term mayor could fund his own national campaign, emphasizes education and the environment over more divisive issues, has made a specialty of building partnerships between government and the private sector and has a no-nonsense style that occasionally flouts the polls. That can-do independence made the mayor a reader favorite in the POLITICO Primary, where the nominating tweets included: @JoDaSh27 (Joseph Shannon): "Fame, Money, the Look, New York, Indy Credential, and even more Money." @thespiansfo (Roy Michael): "Bloomberg is a bipartisan candidate who can work with Dems and the GOP & is a job creator." @JonFacemire (Jon Facemire): "He has dealt with budget problems before, is independent and is pro clean energy." Bloomberg has been the most oft-mentioned potential third-party candidate this cycle but has always dismissed the idea because he is to the left of President Barack Obama on so many social issues, which in normal times would put him far out of step with the electorate. But social issues like gay marriage barely register among voters facing the growing chance of a double-dip recession, making Bloomberg more plausible as a national candidate than he would have been even a year ago. At Bard College's commencement in 2007, Bloomberg told students that he hoped he would one day be known as the "Green Generation": "We are facing the greatest environmental challenge in the history of mankind, and unless we act soon, we could wake up one morning and find ourselves living on a very different planet." And his nominators say a President Bloomberg would mean a very different country.

Erskine Bowles

Candidate Image

The most depressing reality of modern governance is this: The current system seems incapable of dealing with our debt addiction before it becomes a crippling crisis. Few have the courage to propose specific cuts to entitlements, gut military spending, raise taxes or take away government goodies. Instead, most politicians play it safe and dabble around the edges or propose ambiguous ideas, all in the name of political self-protection. But there is a decent chance conventional politicians playing by conventional rules are playing it all wrong. Many voters seem open to, if not hungry for, a real discussion about tough changes. Ask Republicans and Democrats alike to name a serious and responsible thinker who could lead this discussion and the name Erskine Bowles often tops the list. Bowles, 66, is far from an inspirational figure. In fact, he can be as dull as a butter knife in public settings. But he knows budgets, and numbers, and tough choices (he's the man who asked Dick Morris to resign in the Clinton years) and, unlike most, has slapped his name on ideas that upset leaders of both parties but excite deficit hawks on both sides. The Bowles pitch would rest on a rarity in modern campaigns: a very specific proposal for the tough budget choices the country should make. He came up with a truly bipartisan plan that took a real whack at America's long-term deficits, only to see the plan abandoned by Obama, who had appointed him to make those choices in the first place. The options outlined by Bowles and former GOP Sen. Alan Simpson were not the usual nips, tucks and other plastic surgery but, instead, clear and often painful cuts to Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and other programs. The Simpson-Bowles plan uses a mix of spending cuts ($3 trillion) and tax increases ($1 trillion) to do what many of members of both parties, if given truth serum, would say Washington needs to do: save at least $4 trillion over the next decade. Bowles lost two U.S. Senate races in his native North Carolina but might have more appeal with his new chops on deficit-cutting. He's a former banker who would find financial and political support in the business community. In September, he joined the board of Facebook, giving him a tech halo. And he's willing to mix it up, saying on MSNBC during the debt ceiling debate that U.S. creditors "don't love America like you and I do because they're foreign countries." Bowles's bespectacled, professorial look would make him an anti-Obama who hails from a red state but has Democratic roots.

John Chambers

Candidate Image

The politics of 2012 are simple: whoever convinces voters they have the smartest ideas for creating new jobs and a growth economy wins. Voters are dying for someone with a real, plausible vision for winning in a global marketplace dominated by innovation and technology. Experience running something big and achieving big results would be a plus. This creates a clear opportunity for someone from Silicon Valley someone like Chambers, the CEO of Cisco Systems, a company that makes the infrastructure of the Web tick. The guy has a good personal story to tell: He was diagnosed with dyslexia as a kid, overcame it, excelled at Middle America universities - first at West Virginia and later at Indiana - and rose to head one of the world’s largest and most influential companies. He has an even better and more relevant business story to tell: He has pulled a company through a wrenching period - including big layoffs - helped reinvent its culture and operations and made money in the complex global marketplace. He knows firsthand how government can both impede – and encourage – growth and deals daily with the competitive pressures of China and other emerging markets. He could run as an authentic outsider, someone who hasn't spent his life pursuing public office. A Washington-has-no-damn-clue message on navigating and dominating the world economy would resonate for many. His smooth speaking style and self-confidence would play well on the national stage. In an April memo to his employees, Chambers, 62, wrote that his "values and approach to leadership are grounded in part by what I learned from my parents. Both doctors, they taught me to fuel what’s healthy and to heal what's not." The concept is simple in business terms: Invest heavily in concepts that work and pull back or give up on those that don't. Sounds like an excellent prescription for the USA.

Colin Powell

Candidate Image

With public figures at all levels steadily shrinking in the eyes of their constituents, the country craves a physically imposing leader with the moral authority to once again command the national and world stage someone who wouldn't have to win our trust but already has it. No one fits that bill like retired four-star Army Gen. Colin Powell, whose politics were a mystery during his 35 years as a professional soldier, including command of Operation Desert Storm during the Persian Gulf War. He retains a nonpartisan aura in part because of his willingness to dissent sometimes messily when he was serving as secretary of state during George W. Bush's presidency. He cemented his maverick status by endorsing Barack Obama over Sen. John McCain two weeks before the 2008 election. Powell had advised McCain on foreign policy but harshly criticized his choice of Sarah Palin as a running mate and said the GOP had been too "over the top" in attacking Obama. Powell, 74, has made education his signature issue in retirement, broadening his unquestioned expertise in global affairs to include one of the most problematic domestic issues, and one that ranks high with swing voters. As founder of the America's Promise Alliance (now chaired by his wife, Alma), Powell called for better health care and safer streets for children. Born in Harlem and raised in the South Bronx by Jamaican immigrants, and the product of New York City public schools, Powell went on to become the first African-American secretary of state. He was national security adviser to President Ronald Reagan and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under President George H.W. Bush. At a time when Americans are fed up with Pablum, Powell has long argued for blunt discussion about race in America. Explaining why he favors affirmative action, he says that when he came home from Vietnam in 1963, he was denied service in restaurants, hotels and motels. "If my skin was white, or if I could shine it up a little more than it is, and put a hat on my head so my hair wasn't showing as long as I could prove I wasn't black, then I was free to enjoy these benefits," he said during an onstage interview in 1998. "This isn't ancient history to me. This is my lifetime, my generation. ... Some say, 'We don't wallow around in old history.' Why not? We wallow around in the beauty of the Constitution and the Declaration that's old history. So let's wallow around in all of it, as did the black people for all those years." In the POLITICO Primary, @10connorsj (James Connors) cited Powell's "ability to unite the country," and @tmcguire64 (Tom McGuire) tweeted: "Universally respected statesman who can attract moderates and independents." @sparrasol (Sandra) said Powell "can provide the balance and hope to the independent U.S. voters." Alma Powell's resistance has stopped him from running in the past, and his age would be a new hurdle. But Powell enjoys his ability to make news at strategic moments and would surely be tempted by a viable chance to serve his country one more time.

David M. Walker

Candidate Image

While voters swooned in 2008 for a charismatic young politician who had the cool of a Kennedy and the fire of an evangelist, the country's sobering economic setbacks have created an opening for an anti-Obama to capture voters' imaginations in 2012. That explains the unlikely swell of excitement around the bald, bespectacled David M. Walker, a former U.S. comptroller general and CEO of the Government Accountability Office who has made a splash since leaving office by cutting through the B.S. with straight talk and straight math about what he calls the nation's "fiscal cancer." Walker, 60, served as comptroller under both Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, giving bipartisan credibility to his dire forecasts and blunt prescriptions. He staged a "Fiscal Wake-Up Tour" starting in 2005, holding town halls and forums around the country about the threat posed by the federal debt. He was ahead of his time with bearish yet prescient presentations with names like "Saving Our Future Requires Tough Choices Today." In 2007, he said that if presidential candidates don't make the national debt "one of their top three priorities, in my opinion, they don't deserve to be president and we can't afford for them to be president." When Walker left office in 2008, he pointed to "real limitations on what I can do and say," promising he would be even more aggressive in his new role as CEO of the Peter G. Peterson Foundation. Last year, he left to launch the Comeback America Initiative, to push policies to help put America on a less catastrophic fiscal path. The nonpartisan group No Labels started an online campaign backing Walker in the POLITICO Primary, cutting a video urging people to tweet their support for him with messages like: "DraftDave because he stands for an idea bigger than a single candidate: a functioning government." Mark McKinnon, the former strategist for President George W. Bush, tweeted: "I nominate Dave Walker because he ... knows real reform requires everything on the table."

Mark Warner

Candidate Image

Congress is one of the last places to look for innovative ideas, in part because younger politicians tend to be marginalized by leaders who've been around and have absorbed the dysfunctional ways of a paralyzed institution. But what if a younger lawmaker bucked the system and got some traction@f0 Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) did just that with this year's bipartisan Gang of Six senators, who painstakingly formulated the sort of "grand bargain" to cut the deficit that eluded President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner. Warner started with seminars in his conference room to get senators from the two parties on the same factual page, then came up with a plan during late-night sessions at his Alexandria home and at Capitol Hill's Charlie Palmer Steak. Warner, 56, was the first in his family to get a college degree when he graduated from The George Washington University. His reputation at Harvard Law was eerily similar to descriptions of Obama, with one classmate telling Washingtonian magazine: "He wasn't part of a faction. He overlapped everyone." Warner got rich through early expertise in cellphones, giving him the business halo and experience that voters crave at a time when business feels shut out by Washington. In nominating Warner in the POLITICO Primary, @michaelrcks (Michael C.) wrote: "Sen. Mark Warner delves deeply into issues and is willing to work w/ GOP." @jlepfaff (JLEPfaff) tweeted: "[W]e need some1 who will solve problems." When Warner was governor, Virginia was named the best-managed state in the country by a Pew Trust survey. And he won passage of a sizable tax overhaul that included the sort of tradeoffs that Washington would need to accept in order to pass corporate tax reform: Income and food taxes were cut, while the sales and cigarette tax went up. After his Inauguration, he discovered that no one in state government could determine how much was being spent on information technology, then made a priority of improvements and consolidation. Warner's campaign trademark was jogging along parade routes. (On the campaign trail, Warner often sweats through several dress shirts in a day, so he takes a stash with him each morning.) He was first elected in part by courting rural parts of the state that had typically been written off by Democrats. (He even had a bluegrass campaign song.) Once in office, he launched a Motorsports initiative to draw NASCAR-related jobs to the southwest corner of the state. After years of targeting swing counties, Mark Warner one day may be courting swing states. DebateGraph
Wikipedia

David Petraeus

Candidate Image

In the end, every voter wants the same darn thing: a strong leader they can truly believe in. It helps if that leader has made tough, life-and-death choices, and even better if they can prove they have put country before self. Retired Gen. David Petraeus, come on down. There is a reason many strategists fantisize about Petraeus getting out of the spy business and into presidential politics. Petraeus, who was U.S. commander in Iraq and Afghanistan and is now director of the Central Intelligence Agency, has been a top military adviser for both a Republican and a Democratic president the kind of "no-labels" freedom that voters are craving. This election will be dominated by economic issues at home, but the biggest threats to our existence remain overseas, and few understand the complexities of these threats better the man known as the thinking mans general. Petraeus has shrewdly avoided partisan pigeonholing: Liberals once thought he was too close to President George W. Bush, and now he"s been moved to one of the nations most sensitive jobs by President Barack Obama. Most national candidates spend much of their prep time beefing up on national security, but Petraeus has been living the issue for 37 years. One of the most complex missions facing the military is the drawdown in Iraq and Afghanistan, and Petraeus would run circles around just about any opponent on both the theory and the reality of transformation in the war zones. Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates lamented how few Americans know anyone serving in the military, with working classes far outnumbering the privileged in combat. A campaign by Petraeus would put the military and service more generally front and center only fitting for a nation at war. Petraeus, 58, was on the soccer and ski teams at West Point, where he graduated in the top 5 percent of his class and later married the superintendent's daughter. Petraeus showed character and political savvy when he took a technical step downward, from head of the Central Command to leading the war in Afghanistan, after Obama decided to fire Gen. Stanley McChrystal over that embarrassing Rolling Stone article. The veterans vote is a big bloc in several key states, most notably Florida, giving Petraeus a ready-made audience. And perhaps theres an omen in Petraeus's official residence: New Hampshire.

Comments: Politico's Independent Presidential Primary

Results: Politico's Independent Presidential Primary

Depth of Support

Runup to Consensus

6 ballots cast

    [] Hillary Clinton
    1st: 21.7%
    [] Jon Huntsman
    2nd: 18.3%
    [] Colin Powell
    3rd: 16.4%
    [] David M. Walker
    4th: 14.4%
    [] Mark Warner
    5th: 10.3%
    [] Jon Huntsman
    6th: 10%
    [] David Petraeus
    7th: 5%
    [] Condoleeza Rice
    8th: 3.3%
    [] Erskine Bowles
    9th: 2.5%
    [] John Chambers
    10th: 1.3%
    [] Michael Bloomberg
    11th: 1%
  • Runup 10
  • Runup 9
  • Runup 8
  • Runup 7
  • Runup 6
  • Runup 5
  • Runup 4
  • Runup 3
  • Runup 2
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Hillary Clinton
VotesDepth
1st 2
  • 2.00
    2nd 0
  • 0.00
    3rd 0
  • 0.00
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 1
  • 0.17
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    32.17
    Jon Huntsman
    VotesDepth
    1st 1
  • 1.00
    2nd 1
  • 0.50
    3rd 1
  • 0.33
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    31.83
    Colin Powell
    VotesDepth
    1st 1
  • 1.00
    2nd 1
  • 0.50
    3rd 0
  • 0.00
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 1
  • 0.14
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    31.64
    David M. Walker
    VotesDepth
    1st 1
  • 1.00
    2nd 0
  • 0.00
    3rd 1
  • 0.33
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 1
  • 0.11
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    31.44
    Mark Warner
    VotesDepth
    1st 0
  • 0.00
    2nd 1
  • 0.50
    3rd 1
  • 0.33
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 1
  • 0.20
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    31.03
    Jon Huntsman
    VotesDepth
    1st 1
  • 1.00
    2nd 0
  • 0.00
    3rd 0
  • 0.00
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    11.00
    David Petraeus
    VotesDepth
    1st 0
  • 0.00
    2nd 1
  • 0.50
    3rd 0
  • 0.00
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    10.50
    Condoleeza Rice
    VotesDepth
    1st 0
  • 0.00
    2nd 0
  • 0.00
    3rd 1
  • 0.33
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    10.33
    Erskine Bowles
    VotesDepth
    1st 0
  • 0.00
    2nd 0
  • 0.00
    3rd 0
  • 0.00
    4th 1
  • 0.25
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    10.25
    John Chambers
    VotesDepth
    1st 0
  • 0.00
    2nd 0
  • 0.00
    3rd 0
  • 0.00
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 1
  • 0.13
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 0
  • 0.00
    10.13
    Michael Bloomberg
    VotesDepth
    1st 0
  • 0.00
    2nd 0
  • 0.00
    3rd 0
  • 0.00
    4th 0
  • 0.00
    5th 0
  • 0.00
    6th 0
  • 0.00
    7th 0
  • 0.00
    8th 0
  • 0.00
    9th 0
  • 0.00
    10th 1
  • 0.10
    10.10
    : 6 votes 100%
    3 votes moved to from Hillary Clinton
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    1 vote from David M. Walker not transferred
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    Hillary Clinton: 3 votes 50%
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes carried.
    1 vote moved to Hillary Clinton from Mark Warner
    3 votes not transferred. 50%
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    1 vote from David M. Walker not transferred
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    : 3 votes 50%
    1 vote moved to from Jon Huntsman
    1 vote from David M. Walker not transferred
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes. 33.33%
    Hillary Clinton: 2 carried.
    Mark Warner: 1 vote. 16.67%
    1 vote moved to Mark Warner from Erskine Bowles
    : 3 votes 50%
    1 vote moved to from Jon Huntsman
    1 vote from David M. Walker not transferred
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes. 33.33%
    Hillary Clinton: 2 carried.
    Erskine Bowles: 1 vote. 16.67%
    1 vote moved to Erskine Bowles from Condoleeza Rice
    : 3 votes 50%
    1 vote moved to from Jon Huntsman
    1 vote from David M. Walker not transferred
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes. 33.33%
    Hillary Clinton: 2 carried.
    Condoleeza Rice: 1 vote. 16.67%
    1 vote moved to Condoleeza Rice from David Petraeus
    : 3 votes 50%
    1 vote moved to from Jon Huntsman
    1 vote from David M. Walker not transferred
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes. 33.33%
    Hillary Clinton: 2 carried.
    David Petraeus: 1 vote. 16.67%
    1 vote moved to David Petraeus from Jon Huntsman
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes 33.33%
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes carried.
    Jon Huntsman: 2 votes. 33.33%
    Jon Huntsman: 1 carried.
    1 vote moved to Jon Huntsman from Colin Powell
    2 votes not transferred. 33.33%
    1 vote from David M. Walker not transferred
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes 33.33%
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes carried.
    2 votes not transferred. 33.33%
    1 vote from David M. Walker not transferred
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    Jon Huntsman: 1 vote. 16.67%
    Jon Huntsman: 1 carried.
    Colin Powell: 1 vote. 16.67%
    Colin Powell: 1 carried.
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes 33.33%
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes carried.
    Jon Huntsman: 1 vote. 16.67%
    Jon Huntsman: 1 carried.
    Colin Powell: 1 vote. 16.67%
    Colin Powell: 1 carried.
    David M. Walker: 1 vote. 16.67%
    David M. Walker: 1 carried.
    1 vote not transferred. 16.67%
    1 vote from Jon Huntsman not transferred
    Hillary Clinton: 2 votes 33.33%
    Jon Huntsman: 1 vote. 16.67%
    Colin Powell: 1 vote. 16.67%
    David M. Walker: 1 vote. 16.67%
    Jon Huntsman: 1 vote. 16.67%
    Hillary Clinton eliminated.
    Mark Warner eliminated.
    Erskine Bowles eliminated.
    Condoleeza Rice eliminated.
    David Petraeus eliminated.
    Jon Huntsman eliminated.
    Colin Powell eliminated.
    David M. Walker eliminated.
    Jon Huntsman eliminated.

    Instructions


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    Move selections above the red bar

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    Option 2: Drag selection into the ranking area.
    Option 3: Input rank and press [Enter].

    Ballot Instructions


    Review the Choices

    Click a candidate's media link to view available text, video, and supporter information.


    Rank your preferences

    Make your 1st, 2nd, 3rd choices, up to 10th. Then cast and review your ballot. Ballots can be amended until voting closes.


    To rank, move preferences above the red bar

    Option 1: Click to rank a selection #1
    Option 2: Drag selection into the ranking area.
    Option 3: Write a rank into the input box and press [Enter].

    Check the results

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    Voting period for this ballot

    Poll Opens 10/08/2011 06:00
    Poll Closes 12/31/2011 23:00

    The Depth Chart measures overall popularity.


    The Depth score is the sum of votes grouped by rank position, divided by rank number.

    For example, consider a candidate with three 1st place votes, five 2nd place votes, eight 3rd place votes, and three 4th place votes.

    Group Sum/Rank Position = Rank Depth
    3/1 = 3.00
    5/2 = 2.50
    8/3 = 2.667
    3/4 = 0.75

    The overall sum rounds up to a Depth Score of 8.92

    The Depth Score is used to assign colors and break ties when choices receive equal numbers of first place votes.

    Hovering a mousepointer over a candidate's Depth Score segment displays votes by rank.

    The Irving Chart shows how a consensus emerges.


    Totals are displayed in segments ordered left to right by 1st place votes. If no candidate suprasses 50%, the last candidate is eliminated and a runup begins.

    When a candidate is defeated, supporters move to their next remaining eligible choice. If no lower-ranked choice was given, or no eligible choices remain, the vote moves to a "no preference" segment.

    Each successive runup is displayed above the previous one.

    The bottom half of the runup shows movement from previous rounds. The top half shows the number of preferential votes accumulated by the remaining candidates. The Runup cycles repeat until support for a candidate surpasses 50% of votes cast.

    Rolling a mousepointer over a segment displays underlying details. Since this tabulation process is often called an Instant Runoff Vote, this chart is called an IRVing Chart.
    Ranked Ballot

    Rank preferences 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc., up to 10th. It is not necessary to rank every option. To veto, set no rank. Tabulation rules are explained on the Results page.

    Ballots can be reviewed after posting, and amended until voting closes.

    WeVote is meant to work like an online town hall or caucus. Votes are social, not anonymous.

    Click the option link for more features.

    Option Details

    The Ranked Ballot on the left side of this page is interactive.

    Click the link within the ballot for available text or video.

    Tallies of ranked votes are displayed at the bottom of the section.

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